Posts Tagged ‘Balance’

Which Kick is Best for YOU? 2-Beat or 6-Beat
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on March 16th, 2014

This is a guest post by TI Coach Gary Fahey.             A blog post discussing kick strategies landed in my inbox a couple of weeks ago, much of it advocating a six-beat kick (6BK) for all but the most skilled of swimmers. While I disagree with this premise and the example presented […]

The Evolutionary Instinct to Efficiency
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 15th, 2014

What’s the connection between evolution, snow-shoveling, and swimming-improvement? The past few days brought a snow-storm of historic proportions–18 to 24 inches, atop 10 inches from a week earlier. For me, that meant opportunity for my own ‘Winter Games.’ I’ve been skiing on a rail trail for the past week, and was anxious yesterday to get […]

T.I. (‘Tee-Aye’) Chi
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 7th, 2014

Brian Suddeth, a TI enthusiast from Bowie MD. has been helping a blind friend and co-worker, named Mark, to learn efficiency the TI way. Mark had attempted a marathon run, but suffered an injury and had to drop out.  So his new goal is to complete a mile in open water, at the Great Chesapeake […]

Allen Rosenberg Transformed Olympic Rowing: What can his methods do for your swimming?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 15th, 2013

This week, TI Coach Bill Lang sent me a link to a NY Times obituary for Allen Rosenberg,the US national coach for rowing in the 1960s and 1970s, a period of transformation in rowing form and philosophy. Bill shared this with me because he saw such strong parallels between Rosenberg’s principles and those of TI. […]

How Efficient Is Your Freestyle?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on November 8th, 2013

If you regularly read my posts you’re probably aware of the DARPA study which showed that human swimmers are only 3% efficient–as compared to the 80% efficiency of dolphins.  (I.E. Dolphins convert 80% of energy expenditures into forward motion; in contrast humans divert 97% of energy into moving around in the water and moving the […]

Video: The BEAUTY of Effortless. The SKILL of Slow.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on August 1st, 2013

The liveliest thread on the TI Discussion Forum at the moment is titled ‘a question about continuance.’ with, as of this morning, 59 posts, which have drawn over 1300 views. What’s curious about this thread is that the initial query was about how to swim faster, yet the bulk of discussion has centered on various forms […]

How to Swim Faster by Stroking Slower (AND Faster)
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 15th, 2013

How stroking ‘slow AND fast’ at the same time, will move you through the water faster.

by Terry Laughlin

Posted on July 28th, 2012

In regular posts over the next 10 days, I’ll share thoughts that help make the super-human performances of the world’s best swimmers relatable to the ‘average’ swimmers–including those who may be inspired this week to begin a swimming journey. Many of these posts will focus more on how Olympians think, than how they stroke. This can often be of far greater value.

While the mainstream media will handicap the races — breathlessly speculating whether Lochte or Phelps will win the 400 IM– or look for human interest stories, I’m less interested in outcomes or personalities, than in what we can learn from Olympic swimmers that can positively impact our own swimming. And we can often draw more valuable insights from how Olympic swimmers think than how they stroke.

Guest Post: Olympic Swimmer Finds “Magic” in TI Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on June 10th, 2012

Anna Karin Lundin, an Olympic swimmer in 1988 and a Masters World Champion, is swimming better than she ever dreamed possible, with TI. But she’s even more excited about discovering the joys of mindful purposeful TI Practice.

Two Key Lessons for New TI (Adult) Swimmers
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 20th, 2011

Two Lessons for new adult swimmers: (1) Be in This Place and Moment as comfortably and calmly as possible, rather than straining to reach the other end. (2) Don’t self-criticize or judge. Instead learn from every experience.